Monday, May 17, 2010

Bulletin Boards: A Snapshot of our Classroom 2009-2010


Looking over the past year's bulletin boards, we can take pride in the learning that our students have achieved. In Kindergarten, we celebrated their first drawings in "Ropin' in Kindergarten Writers", as part of the writing process, telling stories through pictures, stapling their first booklets, and just maybe find a few beginning sounds on the pages. As if dusted with magic glitter, stories began to unfold with great beginnings, lots of details, and wonderful closings. Students learned to create and follow their writing rubrics and explain why or why not their piece met or did not meet the standard. Students complimented each other saying what they liked about their peer's work. This practice was also carried over into Reader's and Math workshops and has become part of our learning day. As we look over the process of creating a bulletin board: planning, designing, selecting pieces, and writing up comments, we are reminded that the boards are a representative snapshot into our classroom. The last bulletin board for this year is a "Work Over Time" and one of our favorite boards of the year. In "A Noteworthy Kindergarten Finale'", two students' work is the focus: a beginning piece of writing from August, a middle piece from January, and a final piece from April. It is amazing to see the growth that has taken place. Looking at the accomplishments of all of our students' in writing, reading and math and what they have achieved this year has made both their teachers and parents very proud...and we look forward to looping this class to first grade next year. Can't wait to see how far they will go!

3 comments:

dayle timmons said...

A "Work-over-Time" Bulletin Board post! I LOVE it!

Lourdes said...

The "Work-over-Time" board is evidence that Kindergarten has been a "Symphony of Student Success". Standing ovation for the teachers and the children. Can't wait for the "encore" next year!

Melanie Holtsman said...

I love reading your bulletin boards. It makes me really understand what you're working on with the kids during their workshop lessons.